Francis Le Jau to John Chamberlayne (Secretary)

Dublin Core

Title

Francis Le Jau to John Chamberlayne (Secretary)

Description

Francis Le Jau to John Chamberlayne (Secretary), aboard the Greenwich, in Queen's Dock, near Plymouth, 6 May 1706, reporting delays in sailing.

Date

6 May 1706

Identifier

Lambeth SPG 16 112-13

Letter Item Type Metadata

Origin

Letter Type

MS Letter

EMLO Catalogue

Diplomatic Transcription

[Dr Le Jau. Plymouth
6. May 1706]

To
Mr Chamberlayne att his house in Petty France Westminster
near London

a board the Greenwich In the Queens dock near Plimouth
May the 6th 1706

Sir

I am very much concerned that the first time I give my self the honour to write to you is to acquaint you with the news of an unexpected misfortune which putts a stop for the present to my intended voyage. Contrary winds having detained us long enough, we att last put to sea for the third time from Falmouth on monday the 29th of April with a fleet of about 80 sail of merchant men & 15 men of warr. the wind turn’d against us the same day and blew a fresh gale yet the weather being fair enough we kept the sea. on the first day of this month it blew hard and still against us, we were then about 14 leagues of the Lizard and fearing some damage might happen to Our great fleet Sr Stafford Fairborne made a signal for the Merchants to bear away to Land. Some particular orders were sent to us from the flag by the triton Man of warr that ship came so near that our Capt[ai]n was obliged to warn the Commander of her to take care not to run upon us; the wind forced him I think so that to avoid falling fowl of one another which would doubtless have destroy’d both ships we put our helm on the starbord side and unluckily met a little merchant in our way, his rigging was intangled about our boltsprit for half an hour and whatever we could do to prevent damage the two ships could not be clear of one another but we lost our boltsprit and head intirely broke and the merch[an]t lost his main mast. we have many thanks to return to God Almighty that there was no greater harm done considering how it blew. we don’t perceive any damage done to our hull, but the head must of necessity be repaired. our ship is now empty of its guns and casks and they are actually taking the ballast out to make her as light as she can be. the work that must be done will take some time, some say ten days, perhaps more, if the wind which is still contrary should prove fair before we are ready the fleet must certainly sail without us, but whether we shall follow or no cannot be determined till we receive the Princes Commands

Tho I am concern’d in the service of this ship, yet out of an ardent desire to be in the place where I am sent I would willingly go passenger in some other ship; but it is not in my power to bear the charges. We are in hopes still our voyage shan’t be spoild, which would prove a mighty disappointment to our Commodore, officers and Passengers who have layd out Considerably to fit themselves. I remain here not knowing what I can do better, and rely upon the Government of God’s providence that has so visibly protected us chiefly in this last occasion; I hear our head was worm eaten else it would not have been so easily broke and I believe this Accident has happen’d through God’s mercy that the ship may be made safer to prevent the destruction of her when she returns from a long Voyage in the most stormy season of the year, Suppose she goes for virginia. I won’t fail to let you know how things are in relation to my going That The honourable Society my Superiors and Worthy benefactors may be Informed of it. In the mean time I humbly beg of His Grace, their Lordships, and the Reverend and hon[oure]d Members of the Society to accept of the testimonyes of my duty, obedience and Respects. Imploring the help of their charitable Prayers to our Great God in my behalf that I may be bless’d with spiritual Graces to acquit myself faithfully of my obligations to bear patiently hardships, and to overcome the difficultyes I \may/ meet with. God In heaven preserve those Great and Good Persons and bless their Pious undertakings. Honour me in Particular Good sir with the Continuation of your Esteem and Excuse me for not waiting on you a second time to take my Leave of you. It was not in my power to dispose of so much time having such a multitude of things to set in order the 3 or 4 last days I stayd in London. give me leave to assure by this your worthy brother Mr hodges of my singular respect and Affection. I am

Sir

your most humble and obedient servant

Francis Le Jau.

Transcription and MS

[Dr Le Jau. Plymouth
6. May 1706]

To
Mr Chamberlayne att his house in Petty France Westminster
near London

a board the Greenwich In the Queens dock near Plimouth
May the 6th 1706

Sir

I am very much concerned that the first time I give my self the honour to write to you is to acquaint you with the news of an unexpected misfortune which putts a stop for the present to my intended voyage. Contrary winds having detained us long enough, we att last put to sea for the third time from Falmouth on monday the 29th of April with a fleet of about 80 sail of merchant men & 15 men of warr. the wind turn’d against us the same day and blew a fresh gale yet the weather being fair enough we kept the sea. on the first day of this month it blew hard and still against us, we were then about 14 leagues of the Lizard and fearing some damage might happen to Our great fleet Sr Stafford Fairborne made a signal for the Merchants to bear away to Land. Some particular orders were sent to us from the flag by the triton Man of warr that ship came so near that our Capt[ai]n was obliged to warn the Commander of her to take care not to run upon us; the wind forced him I think so that to avoid falling fowl of one another which would doubtless have destroy’d both ships we put our helm on the starbord side and unluckily met a little merchant in our way, his rigging was intangled about our boltsprit for half an hour and whatever we could do to prevent damage the two ships could not be clear of one another but we lost our boltsprit and head intirely broke and the merch[an]t lost his main mast. we have many thanks to return to God Almighty that there was no greater harm done considering how it blew. we don’t perceive any damage done to our hull, but the head must of necessity be repaired. our ship is now empty of its guns and casks and they are actually taking the ballast out to make her as light as she can be. the work that must be done will take some time, some say ten days, perhaps more, if the wind which is still contrary should prove fair before we are ready the fleet must certainly sail without us, but whether we shall follow or no cannot be determined till we receive the Princes Commands

Tho I am concern’d in the service of this ship, yet out of an ardent desire to be in the place where I am sent I would willingly go passenger in some other ship; but it is not in my power to bear the charges. We are in hopes still our voyage shan’t be spoild, which would prove a mighty disappointment to our Commodore, officers and Passengers who have layd out Considerably to fit themselves. I remain here not knowing what I can do better, and rely upon the Government of God’s providence that has so visibly protected us chiefly in this last occasion; I hear our head was worm eaten else it would not have been so easily broke and I believe this Accident has happen’d through God’s mercy that the ship may be made safer to prevent the destruction of her when she returns from a long Voyage in the most stormy season of the year, Suppose she goes for virginia. I won’t fail to let you know how things are in relation to my going That The honourable Society my Superiors and Worthy benefactors may be Informed of it. In the mean time I humbly beg of His Grace, their Lordships, and the Reverend and hon[oure]d Members of the Society to accept of the testimonyes of my duty, obedience and Respects. Imploring the help of their charitable Prayers to our Great God in my behalf that I may be bless’d with spiritual Graces to acquit myself faithfully of my obligations to bear patiently hardships, and to overcome the difficultyes I \may/ meet with. God In heaven preserve those Great and Good Persons and bless their Pious undertakings. Honour me in Particular Good sir with the Continuation of your Esteem and Excuse me for not waiting on you a second time to take my Leave of you. It was not in my power to dispose of so much time having such a multitude of things to set in order the 3 or 4 last days I stayd in London. give me leave to assure by this your worthy brother Mr hodges of my singular respect and Affection. I am

Sir

your most humble and obedient servant

Francis Le Jau.

Part of Collection

Citation

“Francis Le Jau to John Chamberlayne (Secretary),” USPG Online Exhibition , accessed December 6, 2021, http://emlo-portal.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/exhibition/uspg/items/show/27.

Output Formats

Geolocation